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Broadband Faults

Find useful FAQs to help you if you have a query about a broadband fault.

I think there's a fault with my broadband service

My broadband order has just been provided but it's not working. What do I need to do?

 

If your broadband service has been provided but is not working, you should carry out all relevant CP and End User checks.

 

If you have done this and the service is still not working, you can diagnose the fault using Knowledge Based Diagnostics (KBD).

 

You can access KBD from My BT Wholesale. Go to My apps, and then Faults & diagnostics.

 

Select 20C Fault Diagnostics for 20C circuits and New KBD for 21CN and Fibre circuits.

 

 

I think I have a Broadband fault, what is the process?

 

There are several tests to run if your end user is having trouble with their broadband service. Start with CP and end user checks to ensure there are no physical faults with the equipment or problems with the way the service is set up.

 

If this doesn't reveal the cause of the issue, you'll need to run a Knowledge Based Diagnostics (KBD) test. Running KBD is intrusive and can affect your end user's service, so make sure you let them know when you're running it. Alternatively you can run a KBD Lite or non-intrusive diagnostic tests to confirm basic connectivity.

 

If you've carried out your CP and end user checks and have run a full KBD test, follow the recommendations accordingly.

 

To learn more about KBD and other diagnostic tools, take a look at the KBD page in Help & Support.

 

 

What checks do I need to do before I raise a fault?

 

Before reporting a fault to BT Wholesale, you need to carry out your CP and end user checks and run a full Knowledge-Based Diagnostic (KBD) test.

 

Information on CP and End User checks can be found in the guide End User Checks User Guide.

 

 

Faulting and Diagnostic Tools

What diagnostic/faults tools are available?

 

There are a number of tools available to diagnose problems with your broadband service. The Knowledge-Based Diagnostics test (KBD) will run a series of checks. This may affect your end user's service while it's running.

 

Other diagnostic tools will allow you to run stand-alone tests. Most of these tools are available in the My apps section of BT Wholesale Business Zone.

 

 

 

How do I get access to the faulting systems?

 

You can access the faulting systems in BT Wholesale Business Zone, in the "My apps" section. From here go to "Apps A-Z" and click "Show All" for a full list of applications and tools. Most applications accesses are managed via your company administrator using My Admin.

 

You'll need access to the Knowledge-Based Diagnostic tools or KBD (for 20CN IP Stream), New KBD (for WBC-EUA 21CN) and Eco Plus. Details on how to expedite can be accessed via www.btwholesale.com:

 

https://www.btwholesale.com/shared/document/Briefings/Broadband/253-11_Expedite_process.pdf

 

You can access the fast track links on btwholesale.com by going to:

 

My BTWholesale -> My Apps -> Quotes and Orders

 

 

Diagnosing a fault

How do I diagnose a fault?

 

There are several tests to run that will help you diagnose a fault and we request that you do this before contacting BT Wholesale. Start with CP and end user checks to ensure there are no faults with the equipment or problems with the way the service is set up.

 

If this doesn't reveal the cause of the issue, you'll need to run a Knowledge-Based Diagnostics (KBD) test. The KBD test can affect your end user's service, so make sure you let them know when you're running it.

 

After you complete CP and end user checks and have run a full KBD test, follow the recommendations accordingly.

 

To learn more about the KBD and other diagnostic tools, take a look at our online guide https://www.btwholesale.com/pages/static/help-and-support/broadband/knowledge-based-diagnostics.htm.

 

 

 

How do I interpret the KBD outcome?

 

A KBD test will usually reveal the cause of the problem and give a recommendation on what to do next.

 

See the KBD Best Practice guides https://www.btwholesale.com/pages/static/help-and-support/broadband/knowledge-based-diagnostics.htm to learn more about KBD outcomes.

 

 

 

KBD has returned a ‘No Fault Found’ result. What do I do?

 

A 'No Fault Found' test result is returned if the diagnostic tests fail to identify a fault within the BT network.

After completing all CP, End User and KBD tests follow the KBD outcome recommendation.

 

Refer to the KBD Best Practice for more guidance https://www.btwholesale.com/pages/static/help-and-support/broadband/knowledge-based-diagnostics.htm

 

 

 

What is a MFL code?

 

 

During a KBD test, checks that may be carried out include a Copper Line test and/or SFBB Access tests. These tests check the 'Local Access Network' - the connection between the end user's premises and their local exchange.

 

An Main Fault Location (MFL) code identifies faults found on the end user’s line and indicates the location of the fault. You’ll usually receive an MFL code as the result of a KBD check if there is a line fault.

 

Some MFL codes require an engineer visit to the location. In some cases you may need to speak with the end user to make an appointment.

 

The following is a list of MFL codes, the fault location and whether the engineering task requires an appointment with the end user:

 

OK - No fault was found when the test was performed.

 

CA - Customer Apparatus. This usually indicates a fault with the end user's set-up or between the main telephone socket (NTE) and the distribution point (DP). An appointment may be made for an engineer to visit the end user's premises and investigate.

 

LN - Line Fault. A fault was found between the Distribution Point (usually the first telephone pole) and the exchange. An engineer will investigate the issue between the DP and the exchange.

 

CE - Customer Equipment. A fault has been found indicating that there might be an issue with the customer's equipment. An appointment will be made for an engineer to check the line from the end user's premises back to the serving exchange.

 

EX - Exchange. A fault has been found within the serving exchange. An engineer will investigate the issue at the exchange.

 

FU - Frames Unit. A fault has been found on the Main Distribution Frame (MDF) within the serving exchange. An engineer will investigate the issue on the frame.

 

DT - Diagnostic Test. Diagnostic Test failed to run or returned an inconclusive result.

 

CO - Cabinet Optical. An issue has been found in the serving cabinet (also known as the Primary Connection Point, or PCP). An engineer will visit the PCP to resolve.

 

 

 

How do I stabilise a circuit?

 

You should first ensure all CP and End User checks have confirmed there is no local setup affecting the service. A CP user can stabilise a circuit using the DLM Setting tool available from the My Apps section of the BT Wholesale Business Zone.

 

See the accompanying online training and user guides for advice on how to use this: http://www.oneacademy.co.uk/btwholesale/WholesaleAcademy/Learning_Chapters.aspx?chapterId=chapter_12

 

 

 

 

Raising a fault

How do I raise a fault?

 

Please ensure you've carried out CP and end user checks and a full KBD test has been ran before contacting BT Wholesale.

 

The KBD test will advise what you should do next.

 

If the KBD outcome indicates a BT issue, you can raise a fault via Eco Plus (accessible via Business Zone) or your B2B/XML portal.

 

 

 

What reference should I use to raise a fault?

 

The identifier you are required to diagnose and report a fault against depends on the type of service you use.

 

- For IP Stream (20CN), you can report against the Network ID (CBUK), Installation Telephone Number (DN) or Service ID (BBIP/FTIP).

 

- For WBC-EUA (21CN), you can report a fault against the BBEU or DN (Telephone Number).

 

Some stand-alone tools specifically require a Service ID (BBEU/BBIP/FTIP); these will tell you before you begin testing.

 

 

Major Service Outages (MSOs) and Network Outages

What is a Major Service Outage (MSO) and how does it affect my service?

 

An MSO is an incident in the BT network that may impact the broadband service. The impact on your service and the time taken to resolve can vary greatly depending on the situation. 

 

 

 

What is a Planned Network Change Notification (also known as a PNCN or PEW) and how does it affect my service?

 

Planned network change notifications are raised to inform you of planned engineering works. These form an important part of maintaining our network and may affect the broadband service while in progress.

 

 

Engineering Appointments and Tasks

What engineer tasks are there?

 

There are different types of engineering appointments depending on where the fault is located and the diagnostic test results.

 

The MFL code provided on a Copper Line Test will identify if a PSTN related engineering task is required.

 

Other engineering tasks include 'SFI' and 'REIN'.

 

Special Faults Investigation (SFI): An SFI engineer can only be appointed if all test results show that a fault hasn't been found on the line by the BT supplied diagnostic test tools (e.g. No Fault Found, Test OK or Right When Tested). The engineer will test from the end user's premises to the exchange. You’ll need to book an appointment for the engineer to go the the end 's premises and test. This will incur a charge if the issue is found with the end user or CP kit and setup.

 

Repetitive Electrical Impulse Noise (REIN): A REIN engineer is a specialist engineer who investigates issues caused by electrical interference. They are appointed if an engineer has already attended an appointment and believes there might be electrical interference causing a problem with the end user's service.  This can be due to many different factors, from faulty electrical devices in the end user's premises to faulty equipment in neighbouring properties. This type of engineer is tasked at Openreach's discretion only.

 

 

What is an SFI appointment, when should I book one and how much does it cost?

 

A SFI (Special Fault Investigation) appointment can be made to task an engineer to go to your end user's premises and  test the network between the End Users main socket and the serving exchange.

 

 

When do I need to book an engineer appointment?

 

Depending on the issue, a KBD diagnostic check may carry out a Copper Line test or SFBB Access test. These tests check the connection between the End User's premises and their local exchange. This is known as the 'Local Access Network'.

 

The result will advise if an engineer appointment is required.

 

You can book an SFI appointment if all results return a 'No Fault Found - Pass' outcome. Please note that SFI appointments may be chargeable.

 

 

How do I view the progress of an engineering appointment?

 

The latest update will be available via Eco Plus, accessible via Business Zone.

 

 

 

REIN

What is REIN?

 

REIN stands for Repetitive Electrical Impulse Noise. It's a type of electrical interference which can affect your broadband service. It can come from faulty electrical devices in the end user's building, or even neighbouring properties.

 

To learn more, please take a look at our REIN guidance documentation.

 

 

How are REIN faults investigated?

 

REIN faults require a specialist REIN engineer to investigate and resolve. They will usually attend a location on the referral of a previous engineer visit, if it is considered likely that electrical interference is causing a problem. This type of engineer is tasked at Openreaches discretion only.

 

 

 

I've raised a Fault, what next?

How long should it take to fix a fault?

 

There are different guarantees depending on your broadband service level. Please see the relevant Customer Service Plan (CSP) for further details: https://www.btwholesale.com/pages/static/help-and-support/product-documentation.htm

 

 

 

How do I check the progress of a fault?

 

You can check the progress of a fault via Eco Plus.

 

 

 

How often should I receive an update?

 

We will keep you updated on the fault as it progresses. Each update will also tell you when to expect the next, so you always know when it's coming.

 

 

 

There isn’t an update on my fault, what do I do?

 

If there is no update in Eco Plus you can contact us via the Echat service, accessible via www.btwholesale.com.

 

 

 

Escalating a fault

When and how do I escalate a fault?

 

For details of our escalation process, please refer to the relevant Broadband CSP.

 

 

Clearing a fault

How do I know if a fault has been cleared?

 

You can check if a fault has been cleared using Eco Plus, accessible via Business Zone.

 

 

My fault has been cleared but there’s still a fault, what should I do?

 

First, carry out End User and CP checks. If the issue persists then carry out further diagnostics via KBD.

 

If you still believe there is a BT Wholesale fault, you can reject the clear via Eco Plus.

 

 

What is a ‘Welcome Back’?

 

A 'Welcome Back' is a notification that your fault has been cleared and that your service is back up and running. When you receive it, you should check with your end user that their service is fully functioning before accepting the notification, as doing so will close the fault ticket.

 

If there is still an issue with your service, you can reject the Welcome Back notification. Depending on the nature of the fault, you will either be provided with an opportunity to book an SFI engineering appointment, or the fault will be re-submitted to BT Wholesale for further investigation.

 

 

How do I accept a Welcome Back?

 

Details on how to accept and reject a clear or welcome back can be seen here: http://www.oneacademy.co.uk/btwholesale/WholesaleAcademy/Learning_Chapters.aspx?chapterId=chapter_3&o=201306061337446793501#201306061337446793501

 

 

What happens if I don’t accept a Welcome Back?

 

If you don't accept or reject a Welcome Back notification, the fault will automatically close within five to ten working days.

 

 

 

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